{NHBPM Day 7} Redesign a Doctor’s Office (sort of)

I’m trying not to feel guilty for being 5 days behind on National Health Blog Post Month, but things happen! In my case, a never-ending flare has me still catching up on last week’s prompts. 

 

I have to admit that I don’t pay much attention to the waiting room in my doctor’s office, because whenever I’m there I’m usually desperately trying to focus on the reading I need to catch up on, or emailing my professors to let them know that a note from the health services desk will be attached to the homework that I’ll have to leave in their mailbox, or trying not to succumb to the ever-increasing fatigue that attacks at the worst of times.

The waiting room is on the third floor of the tallest building in Harvard Square; its cement façade is out of place among the brick and cobblestone of the tourist-trafficked Square, but it provides one of the best views of our small part of Cambridge. The sunlight streaming in through the large bay windows does nothing to suppress my fatigue, and I often have to remove several layers as I sit in front of those windows, soaking up the sun.

Needless to say, the last thing I’m thinking about in the waiting room is how to redesign it to make it suit my needs better, but I suppose I have some ideas. First of all, I would love to have a clock in this waiting room. Right where a clock should go, there is a sign saying, “If you have waited more than ten minutes past your scheduled appointment time, please see the front desk”, as if to taunt patients with the fact that they will never know how long they’ve waited unless they repeatedly check their own watches or phones. Secondly, those chairs should be reclinable, or at the very least comfortableThere is just no way to get comfortable when you’re crowded in with sick patients who are sweating from the hot sun just as much as you are.

The most important addition I would like to see in the waiting room: tablets complete with software that would provide a likely list of questions your doctor will ask at your visit based upon your presenting symptoms. Does software like this exist? If so, it would go a long way in making each visit as productive as possible. If I didn’t have to stop and think up answers to questions I wasn’t prepared for, I would be better able to articulate myself and make sure I wasn’t missing a key part of my history or symptoms. With a chronic illness, it can be really difficult to remember which symptom goes with which diagnosis, or even to know which symptoms are relevant and worth mentioning. The more doctor’s visits I have, the better I can predict the questions that will be asked, but sometimes brain fog sets in and I need to rely on an external memory device for prompting. Usually, that device takes the form of a scrap paper I scribbled on in the waiting room as I tried to remember what to bring up, or even why I was there in the first place.

If a waiting room had docking stations for tablets that would sync to the doctor’s own tablet or computer, patients could prepare answers to commonly-asked questions (or even not-so-commonly asked questions, so nothing would be left out) as they waited, and then would be able to verbally add more depth to their answers with the doctor’s prompting during the visit. The software could even help the doctor identify rare or forgotten causes of a range of symptoms without stigmatizing the doctor’s lack of knowledge–any red flags would be subtle, and it would still be up to the doctor to decide to pursue more tests or information on anything suggested by the software.

I’m a huge fan of informing doctors of rare or under-diagnosed conditions because conditions like mine often remain undiagnosed–and untreated–until it’s too late to make any preventative treatment decisions. I know we’re probably a long way from using any type of software like this in making health care decisions, but at the very least a check list of commonly-asked questions available in the waiting room could help focus the patient’s mind and provide her with extra time to present a litany of symptoms.

 

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